Tuesday, December 1, 2009

Cubicles Aren't Just For Working

Stacked up in cubicles for decades, immigrants living in a Bowery tenement may have a very unusual situation.
The smell of piss and fish paste are palpable even outside the locked door of 81 Bowery, a four-story tenement just a few buildings up from Canal Street in Manhattan's Chinatown.

The stairwell inside gives off an air of abandonment. On the second floor, a door opens to reveal a nice enough wood-paneled registration counter—a lobby for the hotel on the second and third floors that has been uninhabited for almost a year. There's a statuette of a golden Buddha on the counter and a "Welcome" sign for visitors, along with a plaque advertising a deluxe room for $150 a night. A stack of business cards gathers dust. The rooms aren't bad—each one has a television, and some have neatly made-up queen-size beds.
The fourth floor is very different. The rooms crammed inside are tiny, with walls about eight feet high but no ceilings, and each one about the size of an office cubicle. The dozen or so residents who live on this floor pay about $100 a month to live in what amounts to a broom closet, and all of them share a bathroom with two shower stalls, a urinal, and four toilets. The cubicles are jam-packed with possessions the residents have been piling up for decades. There is no kitchen on the floor.

Driver takes out Italian police's prized Lamborghini Car

When the Italian police unveiled their state-of-the-art Lamborghini patrol cars, they cannot have been short of volunteers itching to take the supercars in pursuit of speeding criminals.
A team of elite drivers was trained to chase down speeding motorists and deliver urgently-needed transplant organs in the futuristic vehicles, capable of reaching more than 200mph.
What they apparently were not prepared for was a distracted motorist who pulled out of a petrol station without looking.
Today, a bandaged and bruised police driver may have had a tough time explaining how he managed to write off one of the force's prized Lamborghinis when he rammed it so hard into a line of parked cars that one of the stationary vehicles ended up on the police car's roof.
According to the police, the crash was caused by the driver of a slow-moving Seat Ibiza who emerged without looking from a service station, clipping the Lamborghini and sending the vehicle swerving into the parked cars.
The front end of the Lamborghini was crushed in the accident, near Cremona, and the driver and a passenger were injured, although not seriously.
The Lamborghini Gallardo, worth £130,000 and capable of reaching 62mph in four seconds, was one of a pair donated by the Italian manufacturer to the police to do battle on Italy's roads, where 1 million motorists are injured annually and 4,731 died last year.
Both cars include transmitters to send images back to HQ, a defibrillator for accidents and a fridge for transporting donor organs. The two officers were returning from a convention in Cremona, where they had been addressed a student audience on road safety.

Beware of Hookers


World's Tallest Female Model Graces Magazine Cover

Talk about a big splash! An American model measuring 205 cm (she's about 6'9") is set to be featured on the cover of Australian magazine Zoo Weekly.
You think you've seen it all. The model, named Eve, appears on the cover of the magazine's current issue alongside a 162 cm-tall (5'3") Aussie model.
On Seinfeld, George Constanza dreamed of one day sleeping with a giant woman. But George was a short, bald fella. To him, tall meant about 5'11".
Eve is truly head and shoulders above the other models out there.
"No other magazine has put a woman who's nearly seven feel tall on the cover," Editor Paul Merrill said, and he's probably correct in that assumption.
"We had ... her bikini specially made, but it was worth it."

N.Y.C. Driver Escape Death

Dodge minivan that entered a construction zone in Manhattan was hit and flipped over by the wrecking ball as onlookers watch in horror. Driver escaped with minor injuries.

How to get fired from work